Finding Your Truth

Finding Your Truth

The phrase finding your truth can be applied to just about any aspect of your life.  Maybe it is the truth about your parenting style, the kinds of work you are and aren't cut out for, how you handle yourself in different conflict situations, how you communicate, etc.  
Today, however, I am talking about achieving and maintaining a healthy balance of food and exercise through your truth.  I've been helping people manage their weight for about six years now and have heard lots of stories. When I first meet with a client, I ask them to tell me about their diet history.  Sometimes I hear stories of lifelong struggles.  Or, I may hear about never having weight struggles until age 30, 40, 50, whatever.  Was menopause the culprit?  Was having children a big factor?  The stories usually start like this. However, as you let people talk, you can almost always tell whether or not someone has accepted their truth about what hand they've been dealt, and if they are in fact ready to make a change.  
What on earth am I talking about? Realizing that your journey is not the same as your sisters/friends/co workers. Watching your friend try a diet and have seemingly instant success may not translate for you when you try the same diet.  Is that fair?  Who cares?  It is what it is. Maybe your sister-in-law can go for a walk once a week and drop ten pounds with that little effort.  Meanwhile, you're consistently going to the gym and working hard and your progress is a tenth of hers.  Oh well.  Good for her. Isn't she lucky?  Wouldn't it be great if it were that easy? I sure would love that, because I love food and sleep.  I used to allow myself to get so angry at people out of sheer jealousy.  I would watch them eat pizza at the Super Bowl party and just seethe.  I knew that if I ate that, I would be up on the scale for weeks.  It just wasn't fair.  So, I would cave and eat the pizza, and then feel even worse the next morning.  I'm not really sure who won there..... Turns out, my attitude was quite immature.  It doesn't matter what works for her compared to what works for me.  MY truth is that I do not have much wiggle room in my diet if I want to maintain my weight.  It's an ugly truth, but it is my truth. 
The next truth that is hard for people to accept is the planning that is required to be successful.  This is where the initial conversation with clients usually turns to lots of reasons why they can't prep food.  Maybe it is too much for you at this point in your life.  Maybe your schedule with your job/spouse/kids doesn't allow for it.  However, I  believe that if you want to make it happen, you can.  The truth you may have to accept is that your diet plan may not include lots of variety.  Maybe you don't have the time to make yourself 18 different options for lunch and dinner.  But do you have time to throw some chicken in the slow cooker?  Probably so.  Will it be boring? Likely.  But will the weight loss be worth it?  I would think so.  Personally, the excitement factor with my own food prep varies depending on what is going on with the rest of my life.  Maybe all I have time for right now is slow cooker protein, boiled vegetables, and some baked potatoes.  Maybe in a few weeks I will have time for soups that I can tend to all day, waffles, or French toast.  The reason I am able to stay on track when it is boring, is because I've failed enough in the past to know that I don't want to have those feelings of failure and sluggishness that come with reverting back to my previous habits. 
So, ultimately, the choice is yours.  You can be successful, if you are ready.  Are you ready to accept the hand you've been dealt?  Are you ready to find your "sweet spot" of the maximum amount of calories you can take in to maintain weight?  Are you ready to plan? If you're ready to do the work, the goal is yours for the taking.